10 Things you’ll learn in MindControlMarketing.com by Mark Joyner

Monday 8:24pm

Saint Paul

 

When people ask me about PRL… or more tellingly, when they don’t ask me… it seems to me that they assume there’s some sorcery going on.

Almost as if I’m able to

Cast Magic Spells to Control Everyone’s Thoughts!

Now I know this isn’t true… and perhaps you know this isn’t true… but the facts remain that people are vulnerable to influence and persuasion, Continue reading “10 Things you’ll learn in MindControlMarketing.com by Mark Joyner”

Mind Reading isn’t Real. Here’s How to Do It.

Mind reading, the art of knowing exactly what the other person is thinking.

It’s a dangerous sport, and one that we’re not very good at. It’s the source of many disagreements and misunderstandings. No matter, we all continue to try.

Image "distant distance" by Rennett Stowe, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
We believe we know what other people are thinking. Image “distant distance” by Rennett Stowe, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

I’ve certainly tried to finish someone’s sentences and been completely wrong. Haven’t you cut in because you knew exactly what the other person was going to say? How did that work out for you? Not always very well, I would bet.

“I opened the door to see…”

“…She was in the house!?” Continue reading “Mind Reading isn’t Real. Here’s How to Do It.”

10 Things You’ll Learn from “Mistakes Were Made (but not by me)” by Tavris & Aronson

“Why do you hate so-and-so, so much?” And he had answered them, with his shameless impudence, “I’ll tell you. He has done me no harm. But I played him a dirty trick, and ever since I have hated him.”

–Dostoyevsky, “The Brothers Karamazov”

Can you justify such behavior? Image from Steve Martin's movie "The Jerk", 1979
Cat Juggling! Can you justify such behavior? Image from Steve Martin’s movie “The Jerk”, 1979

The human brain is excellent at keeping itself free of blame. We have a self-image that we’re a good person, and we also do things that harm others. The cognitive dissonance this causes can be uncomfortable… until we rewrite our memories or justify our actions. Continue reading “10 Things You’ll Learn from “Mistakes Were Made (but not by me)” by Tavris & Aronson”

Facebook and the Principal-Agent Problem

Earlier this week, Mark Zuckerberg testified before the US Congress about User Privacy within The Facebook.

Mark Zuckerberg testifies before Congress in April 2018
Mark Zuckerberg testifies before Congress in April 2018

Six months ago, this wasn’t even a conversation. Continue reading “Facebook and the Principal-Agent Problem”

Focus and Misdirection! Five Rules of Magic (and How They Can Improve Your Persuasion Game)

When I was growing up, my Grandpa always had a joke or a magic trick at the ready. My memories of childhood aren’t well defined, quite fuzzy really, but there are stand-outs with Grandpa Damie’s magic.

"dark jack" by Akki annant, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
“dark jack” by Akki annant, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

Throughout his life and beyond, I’ve heard great things about my grandpa. People remembered his generosity and personal touch. He would receive Christmas cards and accolades years after seeing old friends, coworkers, and neighbors.

How did my Grandpa Damie have such an impact on people?

An impact that was remembered long after? Continue reading “Focus and Misdirection! Five Rules of Magic (and How They Can Improve Your Persuasion Game)”

10 Things You’ll Learn in “Win Bigly” by Scott Adams

Way back in 2012, my wife and I traveled by Amtrak train to Chicago to visit some friends. Between card games in the bar car and beautiful scenery out the window, I read a book about Negotiation.

I was interested in making more money. I wasn’t sure how to ask or even if I was in the right profession. Continue reading “10 Things You’ll Learn in “Win Bigly” by Scott Adams”

Building Rapport for Fun and Profit

Mirroring behaviour helps build rapport. Image "our bench days" by phlubdr, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
Mirroring behavior helps build rapport. Image “our bench days” by phlubdr, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

We choose help people that we like, people that make us happy.

We like people that are similar to ourselves. People that remind us of our best attributes.

Therefor, if we want to be persuasive, we must be likable.

As humans, we mirror one another’s behavior. We reciprocate emotions and we reciprocate favors.

To be persuasive, you Continue reading “Building Rapport for Fun and Profit”

Three Types of Liking:
People Liking People (Part 1)

You like cake? I like ice cream, although I’m flexible.

They’re both desserts. They fall under the same utility in classic Economic Theory, meaning they serve the same purpose: dessert!

Cake or Ice Cream? Photo "Sweet Treats" by Tradlands, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
Cake or Ice Cream? Photo “Sweet Treats” by Tradlands, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

Yet we all know that people have different tastes and preferences. Even economists understand that we like different things, which can make economic models complex!

In his book Influence, Robert Cialdini identified liking as one of his six (now seven) principles of persuasion.

If we want to persuade and influence people, it’s important that we’re liked and that we like others. It’s essential.

No one wants to help the jerk.

But in the age of Social Media, what does it mean to “like?”

Continue reading “Three Types of Liking: People Liking People (Part 1)”