7 things you’ll learn in Dan Kennedy’s “The Ultimate Sales Letter”

10:20pm

Saint Paul

I was browsing my bookshelf the other night, looking for something to start.

(I have more unfinished books than I have fully-read books. Not every book is worth finishing, I’ve learned… though many I plan to return to… I think…)

Now, I noticed my slightly neglected Dan Kennedy section. Dan is a prolific and accomplished copywriter and businessman who has recently fallen ill.

I pulled down my worn copy of The Ultimate Sales Letter and Continue reading “7 things you’ll learn in Dan Kennedy’s “The Ultimate Sales Letter”

This German restaurant advert could be so much… besser

5:24am

Saint Paul, MN

 

Yesterday I mentioned that burger joint’s weaksauce newspaper ad. It could be so much better.

Well it’s pretty early, but I had it on the brain all last night. I thought I’d write some more about the advert.

Continue reading “This German restaurant advert could be so much… besser

The Failure of Science

6:12
Saint Paul, MN

Reader, this weekend I met with a PRL subscriber to discuss marketing emails that I am writing for his business.

Yep, my first paid copywriting gig!

We bounced around with other conversation topics as well, including my wife’s newfound interest in Reiki energy healing.

<cue eye-roll>

My friends asked what I thought of Energy Healing, a topic that’s looked down upon by science and society as being unconfirmed.

My answer? Continue reading “The Failure of Science”

Why People Say NO to Your Good Ideas

People are a suspicious lot, aren’t they?

If you offer to carry someone’s groceries through a parking lot, they’d refuse.

Offer to exchange money with someone, your $20 for their $10 in a clear win for the other person… they’d refuse.

Photo "CL Society 218: Crossing arms" by Francisco Osorio, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
Photo “CL Society 218: Crossing arms” by
Francisco Osorio, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

Both situations are unusual, out-of-the-ordinary.

Humans like what’s known, what’s comfortable. Anything different from the status quo is…

suspicious! Continue reading “Why People Say NO to Your Good Ideas”

“Verbal Judo” and 10 Things You’ll Learn from George J. Thompson

People hardly ever say what they mean. Most people are driven by emotions, especially in highly-charged circumstances. Their words reflect those emotions, even if they act otherwise.

The kid (or coworker) that grumbles throughout a task — is still doing that task (even though she’s not framing it in a positive way).

"Verbal Judo" teaches you to redirect verbal aggression as a Professional
“Verbal Judo” teaches you to redirect verbal aggression as a Professional

The spouse, during an argument, who throws out the incorrect idea that Continue reading ““Verbal Judo” and 10 Things You’ll Learn from George J. Thompson”

God’s Debris by Scott Adams
Book Summary

True, simplicity is not proof of truth. But since we can
never understand true reality, if two models both explain the
same facts, it is more rational to use the simpler one. It is a
matter of convenience.

"God's Debris" by Scott Adams
“God’s Debris” by Scott Adams

Scott Adams’ book God’s Debris introduces us, the reader and first-person narrator, to the world’s smartest person sitting in a rocking chair, Avatar.

You (the narrator) and Avatar hold a wide-ranging conversation about God, religion, science, and probability.

And it’s persuasive.

Join us for a book summary on PRL!

Continue readingGod’s Debris by Scott Adams Book Summary”

Keep ’em at Arm’s Length

Imagine the last argument you had. You were convinced of your position. There’s no way the other person was right.

They thought the same about your argument, of course.

I’d be willing to bet at least one of you crossed your arms in front of yourself to block the very ideas being spoken.

Arms are one of our most expressive forms of communication. They’re used to build trust and rapport, as we’ll see. They’re used for defense. They’re used to communicate effectively at work.

Imagine the college professor, using her arms to focus our attention to different parts of her presentation. Lawyers use their arms to emphasize their points. Traffic cops use their arms to direct the flow around them.

We are naturally inclined to watch people’s arms — so much that illusionists and pickpockets take advantage of this to misdirect our attention.

In addition to emphasizing our speech, sudden changes in our arms also communicate our limbic reactions to our surroundings.

Image "Put your hands up in the air" by Thomas Leuthard, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
Image “Put your hands up in the air” by Thomas Leuthard, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

Continue reading “Keep ’em at Arm’s Length”