If most people fail to meet their goals, why would they have good advice? (My Life in Advertising: Chapter 8)

Last week on PRL, we discussed Hopkins’ career in medical advertising. After seeing all the cash being made by his own advertising efforts, Hopkins gets interested in his own profits.

Chapter Eight, Hopkins is recruited to work at Liquozone, a failing company selling another medical tonic.

Liquozone was Hopkins' own medicine company after he and investors really spent $100,000 to buy the product rights for the US market.
Liquozone was Hopkins’ own medicine company after investors really spent $100,000 to buy the product rights for the US market.

Against the opposition of his friends, Hopkins takes the job. He is to be paid no starting salary. He reasons that if most people fail to meet their goals, why would they have good advice? Tweet This

Hopkins creates a new scheme for Liquozone, where six bottles are available for $5, guaranteed to work. Again, he has a druggist sign the paperwork for the guarantee, lending authority to the tonic.

Light through the ear? Because yeah, druggests have the best reputation. Image by Arallyn, Flickr, By-CC-2.0
Light through the ear? Because yeah, druggists have the best reputation. Image by Arallyn, Flickr, By-CC-2.0

“I had a proposition which no reasonable person can refuse.” Hopkins insists that a salesman should remove all attempt of protecting himself in a deal. Make an offer that the buyer should not reasonably refuse, and the sale is easy.

Vague facts never sell as well as specific claims. Image by Arallyn, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
Vague facts never sell as well as specific claims, such as the price of Liquozone. Image by Arallyn, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

Within one year, Hokpins has enough sales to turn the Liquozone company around with a large profit.  The advertising lesson learned is “ask a person to take a chance on you, and you have a fight.  Offer to take a chance on him, and the way is easy.” Tweet This