Sabotage, Judgment, and Subjective Truth

“Ain’t no way that I can be happy when I’m happy” —Atmosphere, Give Me

How many times have you seen someone self-sabotage their own life?

I known people who have dropped out of school, directionless. I known people who have arrived to work drunk. I known people who have ruined a relationship over a few hours of fun. I’ve known people that sacrifice sleep and performance for video games.

All of these choices in the present have impacts that can last decades into the future.

Do you know why these people do what they do?

We can’t know people’s private thoughts. We can’t read their minds now, and we can’t deduce their feelings and opinions from the past.

"Head shot" by erat, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
“Head shot” by erat, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
Motivations are generally unknown Continue reading “Sabotage, Judgment, and Subjective Truth”

Seven Suggestions on Improving Soccer Performance

The 2018 World Cup is in full swing. If you haven’t caught any yet, you can stream the last few games here on Telemundo.

The world’s best players are out: Messi, Ronaldo, Neymar – unable to mesh with their national team, unable to pull those teams ahead on their own.

England’s national team, once a soccer powerhouse and the inventors of ‘football,’ has had abysmal international performance since 1996.

Apparently a missed shootout in 1996 has cursed the national team ever since.

Complicating the matter, that failed kicker from 1996 is now the head coach of England’s 2018 World Cup team.

Gareth Southgate isn’t letting his past failures define him. Instead he is using this as a stepping stone to teach his team about mindset and stretching past their comfort zone.

Persuasion is all about changing minds for better outcomes.

A friend recently asked how she could improve her own soccer performance. She felt that her skills were deteriorating and in need of a boost.

"IMG_1093" by Peter, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
“IMG_1093” by Peter, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

Here were my seven suggestions, based on self-persuasion.

Continue reading “Seven Suggestions on Improving Soccer Performance”

“Everything is Relative” — Lessons on Decision Making from Dan Ariely’s “Predictably Irrational”

In his 2008 book “Predictably Irrational,” Dan Ariely opens our eyes to our decision making process and how it can be used against us.

Everything is Relative.

Our choices are made in comparison to other options, and what we might lose or gain with these decisions. Unfortunately, all too often we don’t know the value of those options at all! For example, do you really know the price and quality of one television set over another?

If given a set of options, Ariely lays out the predictable choices in each:

Behaviors drive Attitudes

It’s been said that a Weatherman is the only job where you can often be wrong and still keep your job. How often is your local forecast far from what transpires? (or perspires)

"Out of the mist" by Jeremy Segrott, Flickr, CC-By-2.0
“Out of the mist” by Jeremy Segrott, Flickr, CC-By-2.0

Two people meet in the road.

“What a beautiful day!” exclaims the first, looking up.

“Oh, but I think it might rain,” laments the second, looking down at his phone.

And they go on their ways.

This short exchange highlights two vastly different mindsets of the characters. Continue reading “Behaviors drive Attitudes”

“Drive” — 10 Things I learned from Daniel Pink

A few jobs ago in a different company, I split my time between IT Support and IT Sales. It was my first job in IT. I felt lucky to be there.

Drive by Daniel Pink
Drive by Daniel Pink

In the Sales role, my sales manager was constantly looking over my shoulder.

I would compose an email to a client and he would revise it.

I would write up a specific piece of hardware and he would suggest something different.

Continue reading ““Drive” — 10 Things I learned from Daniel Pink”